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Roadshow wget speed reporting bug?

Support Roadshow

Moderators: AndreasM, olsen

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cmsj
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 7
Joined: 09.03.2016 - 20:34

Roadshow wget speed reporting bug?

Post by cmsj »

I've just installed Roadshow on a 3.1 A600, with a NetGear FA411 ethernet card.

I'm using wget to fetch some files from a machine on my LAN, and I think wget is reporting the speed incorrectly.

For example, I just grabbed a 206K (210472 byte) file in 11 seconds, but the reported speed is 16.33B/s.

By my calculations, at 16 bytes/sec, the download would have taken 3 hours, but the numbers work for 16KB/s.

Hardly the worst bug in the world, but I thought I'd mention it, and say thank you for Roadshow :)

olsen
CygnusEd Developer
Posts: 127
Joined: 06.06.2006 - 16:27

Re: Roadshow wget speed reporting bug?

Post by olsen »

cmsj wrote:I've just installed Roadshow on a 3.1 A600, with a NetGear FA411 ethernet card.

I'm using wget to fetch some files from a machine on my LAN, and I think wget is reporting the speed incorrectly.

For example, I just grabbed a 206K (210472 byte) file in 11 seconds, but the reported speed is 16.33B/s.

By my calculations, at 16 bytes/sec, the download would have taken 3 hours, but the numbers work for 16KB/s.

Hardly the worst bug in the world, but I thought I'd mention it, and say thank you for Roadshow :)
Thank you for reporting this oddity.

I suspect that the deeper reason why the figures are so off is due to the process by which the "wget" command calculates throughput. The number of bytes transmitted so far is divided by the time that has passed, which for very small numbers can produce wildly inaccurate figures (the relevant code is in the "wget/process.c" file, specifically the "print_download_speed()" function). Typically, the longer it takes and the more data is transported, the better the average approaches the real throughput.

It is still difficult to make predictions, in particular about the future ;-)

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